ADAS acronyms


Overview of ADAS technology acronyms (updated)

The field of automotive advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) is still growing rapidly. Several systems are already on the market, several of which include processors and technologies developed by videantis. These systems make our vehicles safer and more comfortable to drive. To help you navigate the many acronyms that are in use in this industry, here’s a helpful list of definitions. Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have additional ones you’d like to see added to this list.

ACC – Adaptive Cruise Control

Cruise control system that automatically adapts speed to maintain a safe distance from vehicles in front.

AD – Autonomous Driving

The situation where a vehicle is self-driving, where there is no human driver required to take control.

AV – Autonomous Vehicle

A self-driving vehicle in which human drivers are never required to take control.

ADAS – Advanced Driver Assistance System

An electronic system that aids the driver for a safer and more comfortable driving experience. Often based on camera technology, but can also include other sensors like radar, laser, or ultrasound.

AEB – Automatic Emergency Braking, Autonomous Emergency Braking, Active Emergency Braking

Automatic Emergency Braking monitors the proximity of vehicles in front, or behind the vehicle in case it is in reverse, detecting situations where a collision is imminent. Braking is then automatically applied to avoid the collision or mitigate its effects.

AES – Autonomous Emergency Steering

A system that automatically steers the vehicle to help avoid a collision, usually combined with an automatic emergency braking system.

AFW – Adaptive Forward Lighting, AFLS – Adaptive Front Lighting System

System that automatically turns the headlight beam to the right or left dependent on the vehicle’s direction in curves.

AHBC – Adaptive High Beam Control

Adaptive High Beam Control detects oncoming traffic and vehicles in front, automatically adjusting the headlamp beam high and low.

Also known as Adaptive Light Control.

ALC – Adaptive Light Control

Adaptive Light Control detects oncoming traffic and vehicles in front, automatically adjusting the headlamp beam high and low.

Also known as Adaptive High Beam Control.

ALK – Autonomous Lane Keeping

Lane Keeping Assist combines a forward-facing camera to detect lane markings with an electric steering system, keeping the vehicle in the center of the lane.

See also Lane Keeping Assist.

ANV – Automotive Night Vision

Automotive Night Vision captures images using a thermal camera or active infrared lighting and presents it on a dashboard display. This increases the driver’s perception and viewing distance during nighttime.

Also known as Night View Assist.

APS – Automatic Parking System

Automatic Parking Systems are designed to help a driver park. Some perform the entire job automatically, while others simply provide advice so that the driver knows when to turn the steering wheel and when to stop.

See also Intelligent Parking Assist and Parking Assist.

BSD – Blind Spot Detection, BSA – Blind Spot Assist, BSM – Blind Spot Monitoring, BSW – Blind Spot Warning, BLIS – Blind spot Indication System, SBSA – Side Blind Spot Alert

Blind Spot Detection systems provide vital information about the vehicles blind spots, areas that cannot be seen easily by the driver. Some of these systems will sound an alarm if they sense the presence of an object within a blind spot, others include cameras that transmit camera images to a display in the dashboard.

See also Lane Change Assist.

BOP – Back-over Protection, Back-over Prevention

A back-over protection or prevention system can combine both ultrasonic and rear-view camera technologies to increase safety while backing up, ensuring the driver doesn’t hit a pedestrian, vehicle or other object.

CAS – Collision Avoidance System

Collision avoidance systems use a variety of sensors to determine whether a vehicle is in danger of colliding with another object. These systems sense the proximity of other vehicles, pedestrians, or other objects on the road. When the vehicle is in danger of colliding with another object, the collision avoidance system will warn the driver and take preventive actions, such as precharging the brakes, apply tension to the seat belts, or take over steering.

Similar to Crash Imminent Braking or Collision Detection Warning.

CDW – Collision Detection Warning

Collision Detection Warning systems use a variety of sensors to determine whether a vehicle is in danger of colliding with another object. These systems sense the proximity of other vehicles, pedestrians, or other objects on the road. When the vehicle is in danger of colliding with another object, the collision avoidance system will warn the driver and take preventive actions, such as precharging the brakes, apply tension to the seat belts, or take over steering.

Similar to Crash Imminent Braking or Collision Avoidance Systems.

CIB – Crash Imminent Braking, Collision Imminent Braking

CIB systems automatically apply the brakes in a crash imminent situation if the driver does not respond to warnings.

Similar to Collision Detection Warning or Collision Avoidance Systems.

CMS – Camera Monitor System, Camera Mirror System

A system that adds monitors, or displays, to the car, presenting the view of externally mounted cameras. For instance rear view cameras or mirror replacement cameras that remove the need for left, right, or rear-view mirrors, and present a better view of the vehicle’s surroundings.

C-NCAP – China New Car Assessment Programme

Chinese car safety assessment program. It is primarily modeled after safety standards established by Euro NCAP and is run by the China Automotive Technology and Research Center

CTA – Cross-Traffic Alert

These systems let you know if you’re about to run into oncoming cross traffic. Multiple sensors or wide angles cameras are located near the front or rear of the vehicle, detecting traffic that comes from the side, typical in parking lot situations.

See also Rear Cross-Traffic Alert.

DBS - Dynamic Brake Support

Supplements the driver’s braking input if the driver isn’t applying sufficient braking to avoid a rear-end crash.

See also Active Emergency Braking.

DDW – Drowsy Driver Warning, DFW – Driver Fatigue Warning, DDD – Driver Drowsiness Detection, DMS – Driver Monitoring System, DAS – Driver Alert System

Driver drowsiness or awareness detection systems use cameras or other sensors to determine if a driver’s attention is still on the road and on operating the vehicle safely. Most systems track eye blinking rates and gaze direction. Some of these systems look for the driver’s head to nod in a telltale motion that indicates sleepiness.

EVWS – Electric Vehicle Warning Sound

A system that makes sounds designed to alert pedestrians to the presence of electric drive vehicles that make very little noise.

EDA – Emergency Driver Assistant

A driver system that monitors driver behavior. If the system concludes that the driver is no longer able to safely drive the vehicle, the car takes the control of the brakes and the steering to bring the vehicle to a stop.

Euro NCAP - New Car Assessment Programme

The European New Car Assessment Programme, the European organization that defines car safety performance assessment programs.

FCW – Forward Collision Warning, FCWS – Forward Collision Warning System, FCA – Forward Collision Avoidance

Forward Collision Warning systems use a variety of sensors to determine whether a vehicle is in danger of colliding with another object. These systems sense the proximity of other vehicles, pedestrians, or other objects on the road. When the vehicle is in danger of colliding with another object, the collision avoidance system will warn the driver and take preventive actions, such as precharging the brakes, apply tension to the seat belts, or take over steering.

FOV – Field of View

Describes the angular extent of a given scene that is imaged by a camera, typically in degrees. For instance, a 180 degree FOV camera has a very wide angle lens that can capture the full side of the vehicle.

FuSa – Functional Safety

Functional safety is the part of the overall safety of a system or piece of equipment that depends on automatic protection operating correctly in response to its inputs or failure in a predictable manner (fail-safe). The automatic protection system should be designed to properly handle likely human errors, hardware failures and operational/environmental stress.

GFHB – Glare-free High Beam

The Glare-free High Beam function allows driving with the high beam on at all times. If the camera detects other traffic on the road, the distribution of light from the high beams is adjusted in order to not blind the approaching driver.

See also Head Lamp Assist.

HLA – Head Lamp Assist

The Head Lamp Assist function allows driving with the high beam on at all times. If the camera detects other traffic on the road, the distribution of light from the high beams is adjusted in order to not blind the approaching driver.

See also Glare-free High Beam.

HUD – Head-up-Display

A transparent display that shows information on the front windshield, allowing drivers to keep their eyes on the road, instead of having to look away toward information on the dashboard.

HDC – Hill Descent Control

A system that adjusts speed by applying the brake or shifting to lower gears during descent from a hill.

ISA – Intelligent Speed Adaptation, Intelligent Speed Advice

A system that monitors vehicle speed, warning the driver to adjust their speed in case it is higher than the allowed limit. Typically uses Traffic Sign Recognition and map data to determine the allowed speed limit.

IHBC – Intelligent High Beam Control

The Head Lamp Assist function allows driving with the high beam on at all times. If the camera detects other traffic on the road, the distribution of light from the high beams is adjusted in order to not blind the approaching driver.

See also Glare-free High Beam and Head Lamp Assist.

IPAS – Intelligent Parking Assist System

Intelligent Parking Assist Systems are designed to help a driver park. Some perform the entire job automatically, while others simply provide advice so that the driver knows when to turn the steering wheel and when to stop.

See also Parking Assist and Automatic Parking System.

JNCAP – Japan New Car Assessment Program

JNCAP promotes the use of safer cars by creating the environment in which automobile users can easily select such vehicles and by encouraging automobile manufacturers to develop safer vehicles.

KSI – Killed or Seriously Injured

Number of people killed or seriously injured.

L0 – Level 0 automation of driving

No automation. The driver operates the vehicle at all times. Defined by SAE International, an automotive standardization body, under J3016.

L1 – Level 1 automation of driving

Driver assistance. The driver assistance system controls either the steering or acceleration/deceleration. The human driver monitors at all times and performs all remaining aspects of the  driving task. Defined by SAE International, an automotive standardization body, under J3016.

L2 – Level 2 automation of driving

Partial automation. The driver assistance system controls both steering and acceleration/deceleration. The human driver monitors at all times and performs all remaining aspects of the  driving task. Defined by SAE International, an automotive standardization body, under J3016.

L3 – Level 3 automation of driving

Conditional automation. The driver assistance system controls both steering and acceleration/deceleration. The human driver has to be ready to intervene and take over at all times. Defined by SAE International, an automotive standardization body, under J3016.

L4 – Level 4 automation of driving

High automation. The driver assistance system controls both steering and acceleration/deceleration. The system continues to operate even if the human driver is not ready to intervene. The system does not support all roads and road conditions. Defined by SAE International, an automotive standardization body, under J3016.

L5 – Level 5 automation of driving

Full automation. The driver assistance system controls both steering and acceleration/deceleration. The system continues to operate under all roadway and environmental conditions that a human driver can manage. All roads and road conditions are supported. Defined by SAE International, an automotive standardization body, under J3016.

LA – Lighting Automation

Lighting Automation allows driving with the high beam on at all times. If the camera detects other traffic on the road, the distribution of light from the high beams is adjusted in order to not blind the approaching driver.

See also Glare-free High Beam, Head Lamp Assist, and Intelligent High Beam Control.

LCA – Lane Change Assist

Lane change assist senses a vehicle approaching in a neighboring lane while you signal for a lane change. The vehicle can alert the driver with a flashing indicator in the side mirror.

See also Blind Spot Detection.

LCA – Lane Centering Assist

Lance Centering Assist combines a forward-facing camera to detect lane markings with an electric steering system, keeping the vehicle in the center of the lane.

See also Lane Keeping Assist.

LD – Lane Detection

Using a forward camera to detect lane markings on the road.

LDW – Lane Departure Warning, LDWS – Lane Departure Warning System

Lance Departure Warning uses a forward-facing camera to detect lane markings, warning the driver in case the vehicle leaves the lane without proper use of the turn signal.

LKA – Lane Keeping Assist, LKAS – Lane Keeping Assistance System

Lane Keeping Assist combines a forward-facing camera to detect lane markings with an electric steering system, keeping the vehicle in the center of the lane.

See also Lane Centering Assist.

LTA – Left Turn Assist

When crossing a road to turn left, oncoming traffic may be overlooked or its speed may be misjudged. A left turn assist system warns the driver or automatically brakes in case it’s not safe to turn left.

MOD – Moving Object Detection

A system that detects moving objects around the vehicle, typically during parking or slow maneuvering. Typically uses multiple cameras located around the vehicle.

NCAP - New Car Assessment Programme

The European New Car Assessment Programme, the European organization that defines car safety performance assessment programs.

NHTSA – National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

An agency of the U.S. federal government, part of the Department of Transportation, which defines and enforces vehicle safety standards.

NVA – Night View Assist

Night View Assist captures images using a thermal camera or active infrared lighting and presenting it on a dashboard display. This increases the driver’s perception and seeing distance during nighttime.

Also known as Automotive Night Vision.

OC – Online Calibration

A camera-based system that calibrates itself during start up of the car, or in real-time. This is in contrast to a camera system that needs to be calibrated in the factory or garage.

OD – Object Detection

A computer vision algorithm that detects objects in view of a camera: for example pedestrians, vehicles, animals, or cyclists.

OSD – Optical Surface Dirt

A camera system that automatically detects whether the camera lens is dirty and warns the driver or takes other appropriate action.

PA – Parking Assistance

Parking Assistance systems are designed to help a driver park. Some perform the entire job automatically, while others simply provide advice so that the driver knows when to turn the steering wheel and when to stop.

See also Automatic Parking System and Intelligent Parking Assist.

PD – Pedestrian Detection, PDS – Pedestrian Detection System

A system that detects pedestrians in front or behind the vehicle, typically camera-based.

PAEB – Pedestrian Automatic Emergency Braking

A system that performance automatic braking in cases a pedestrian is detected in front of the vehicle.

PLD – Parking Line Detection

A system that detects markers on the road surface in order to determine the exact location of parking lots.

See also Parking Slot Marking Detection.

PSMD – Parking Slot Marking Detection

A system that detects markers on the road surface in order to determine the exact position of parking lots.

See also Parking Line Detection.

RCTA – Rear Cross-Traffic Alert

These systems let you know if you’re about to back into oncoming cross traffic. Multiple sensors or wide angles cameras are located near the rear of the vehicle, detecting traffic that comes from the side, typical parking lot situations.

See also Cross-Traffic Alert

RSA – Road Sign Assist

A Road Sign Recognition system is a camera-based technology that detects and analyzes the traffic signs next to the road. Speed limit signs can for instance be used to control speed of the vehicle. Often the important traffic signs are shown on the dashboard in order to inform the driver.

See also Traffic Sign Assist.

RVC – Rear view camera

A camera that’s mounted in the rear of the vehicle, facing backward.

SAD – Semi-Autonomous Driving

A driving system that is primarily autonomous, but requires the driver to monitor and take control of the vehicle in case the automated driving system cannot safely operate the vehicle.

SVC – Surround View Camera, SVS – Surround View System

Multi-camera surround view camera systems capture and display the area surrounding the car in a single integrated view on a display in the dashboard.

See also Surround View Park Assist.

SVPA – Surround View Park Assist

Multi-camera surround view park assist systems capture and display the area surrounding the car in a single integrated view on a display in the dashboard.

See also Surround View Camera.

TJA – Traffic Jam Assist

A Traffic Jam Assist system keeps distance and adapts speed and optionally takes control of steering in lower-speed, dense traffic situations.

TSR – Traffic Sign Recognition

A Traffic Sign Recognition system is a camera-based technology that detects and analyzes the traffic signs next to the road. Speed limit signs can for instance be used to control speed of the vehicle. Often the important traffic signs are shown on the dashboard in order to inform the driver.

See also Road Sign Assist.

TLR – Traffic Light Recognition

A Traffic Light Recognition system is a camera-based technology that detects and analyzes traffic lights, either to inform the driver or to provide information to the vehicle for autonomous driving.

TA – Turning assistant

The Turning Assistant system monitors opposing traffic when turning at low speeds, even autonomously applying the brakes in case of unsafe situations.

UPA – Ultrasonic Park Assist

A Parking Assist system that solely uses ultrasonic sensors. Ultrasonic sensors can detect distance, but can’t detect smaller objects well, nor can they find parking spot markers.

See also Parking Assist.

VRU – Vulnerable Road User

Non-motorized road users, such as pedestrians, cyclists, motor-cyclists and persons with disabilities or reduced mobility and orientation.

VUT – Vehicle Under Test

Refers to the car that’s being tested, often in the context of a testing protocol.

WWDW – Wrong-Way Driving Warning

A system that warns the driver when she is traveling into the wrong direction. Typically uses a Traffic Sign Recognition system to detect wrong-way traffic sign indicators.

See also Wrong-Way Driving Alert.

WWDA – Wrong-Way Driving Alert

A system that warns the driver when she is traveling into the wrong direction. Typically uses a Traffic Sign Recognition system to detect wrong-way traffic sign indicators.

See also Wrong-Way Driving Warning.

27/11/2019 / Marco Jacobs